The “Point Law” experience enabled me to purchase my first serious camera, and sparked a passion for photography that grew over the decades. Numerous other scoops followed, especially involving sea rescues facilitated by my voluntary duties as a crew member of the Jersey all-weather lifeboat.
I continued to gain formal experience in large format, medium format and 35mm photography, using classic cameras such as Linhof, Hasselblad, Rolleiflex, Leica, Canon and Nikon, covering architecture, advertising, social photography, fashion and various other fields, but my real passion remained with photojournalism.
I am still a freelance and accredited press photographer, but I now spend most of my time as an amateur photographer, taking street photographs, which will be archived for future generations when they become “old” enough to have that fascination that only old photographs seem to have.
As an amateur street photographer I am no longer constrained by client expectations, and am able to enjoy the freedom of refusing to crop, straighten or use Photoshop on my images, and to strive for perfection at the point of taking the photograph, rather than take an average image and try to make it good using a computer.
I shoot street photography only in black and white, and the only adjustment I allow is contrast at the printing stage. I use a manual digital rangefinder camera for street photography with a fixed standard lens, so my legs are my zoom! I work very close to my “victims”. All of my street photographs are captured spontaneously, usually without the subject ever even realising their photo has just been taken, even though I will be typically only one or two metres away. My subjects are almost always unknown to me.
I believe that street photography is not art; it is documentary; it is an historic record for future generations. It is simply using a machine to mechanically record a view.
All of these photographs were taken in public places in Italy and Europe during the last few years, and are mostly of the people of the cities of Verona and Milan going about their daily lives.
The camera is possibly the only machine in the world that can stop time.

Paul Crespel, Verona 2013


ITALIANO
Sono fotoreporter da oltre quarant'anni, coprendo un arco temporale di cinque decenni e due secoli.
Mi sono fatto un nome nel 1975, a soli sedici anni, con un servizio fotografico sulla “Point Law”, una petroliera costiera che era finita in secca a piena velocità nel sud-ovest dell’isola di Alderney il 15 luglio 1975. Ero sceso scalando sessanta metri di scogli in condizioni atmosferiche proibitive per ottenere scatti ravvicinati dell’elicottero e della lancia di salvataggio mentre recuperavano e portavano in salvo le dodici persone dell’equipaggio.
In quell’occasione ero riuscito a vendere le fotografie a molti quotidiani britannici, e queste furono poi ulteriormente rivendute in tutto il mondo dalle agenzie di stampa.
L’esperienza della “Point Law” mi ha permesso di acquistare la mia prima macchina fotografica seria, e ha innescato una profonda passione per la fotografia che ha continuato a crescere nel tempo.
Sono seguiti numerosi altri scoop fotografici riguardanti soprattutto salvataggi in mare, facilitato dal mio lavoro come membro volontario dell’equipaggio della lancia di salvataggio estremo di Jersey.
Ho continuato a sviluppare esperienza nella fotografia in formato grande, medio e 35 mm, usando macchine fotografiche classiche come Linhof, Hasselblad, Rolleiflex, Leica, Canon e Nikon, occupandomi di architettura, pubblicità, fotografia sociale, moda e molto altro, ma la mia vera passione è sempre rimasta quella del fotogiornalismo.
Sono ancora oggi un fotografo di stampa freelance e accreditato; ma adesso mi godo per lo più la fotografia in modo amatoriale scattando fotografie di strada da archiviare per le generazioni future, quando le immagini risulteranno abbastanza vecchie per emanare quel fascino particolare che solo le foto “dei tempi passati” sono in grado di sprigionare.
Come fotografo di strada amatoriale non sono più vincolato alle aspettative dei clienti, e posso godermi la libertà di non tagliare, raddrizzare o usare Photoshop sulle mie immagini: cerco, invece, di ottenere la perfezione nell’attimo stesso in cui scatto ogni singola foto – non di ottimizzarla in seguito al computer, per rendere valido un risultato magari mediocre.
Scatto solo in bianco e nero, e l’unico aggiustamento che mi concedo è giocare sul contrasto in fase di stampa.
Per la street photography uso una macchina fotografica digitale a telemetria, completamente manuale con lenti fisse standard, in modo tale che le mie gambe siano il mio zoom!
Lavoro molto vicino alle scene che riprendo. Tutte le mie foto di strada sono “catturate” spontaneamente, e anche se di solito mi avvicino fino a uno o due metri spesso i soggetti nemmeno si accorgono di essere stati immortalati. La maggior parte di loro ignora di essere stata fotografata.
Credo che la street photography non sia un’arte; la considero un’attività documentaria, una registrazione del momento storico presente a vantaggio delle generazioni future. Consiste semplicemente nell’usare una macchina per fissare in modo meccanico qualcosa che si vede.
Tutte le foto di questo sito web sono state scattate in Italia e Europa - in posti pubblici - negli ultimi anni, e ritraggono per lo più persone di Verona e Milano nella loro quotidianità.
Spesso penso che la macchina fotografica sia la sola macchina al mondo capace di fermare il tempo.

Paul Crespel, Verona 2013





(TRADUZIONE IN ITALIANO SOTTO)

ENGLISH
I have been a photographer for over 40 years, extending over 5 decades and two centuries. I made my name in 1975, at the age of 16, with my photographic coverage of the “Point Law”, a Shell-Mex & B.P. coastal tanker that ran aground at full speed on the southwest of the island of Alderney on 15 July 1975. I scaled 60m cliffs in gale conditions to capture close-up shots of the helicopter and lifeboat rescuing the crew of 12. I was able to sell the photographs to many British newspapers, which were then further syndicated worldwide.

INTRODUCTION TO GOTCHA! BY PETER EUSTACE
(TRADUZIONE IN ITALIANO SOTTO)

The Way It Is.
Paul Crespel insists that his photography is "documentary". His subject matter is people and he shows us these people as they are and life as the way it is. Yet this claim certainly does not mean there is no "art or craft" in these images. They are the work of a highly skilled photographer with a sharp eye and possibly even sharper reflexes. Being in the right place at the right time is not something that happens by accident: it takes a lot of hard work - technical mastery, total control over equipment and, especially in Paul's case, an immense amount of legwork. He walks miles and miles, going back over his ground again and again to absorb the settings, let people become used to his presence and even foresee shots before they actually arise. His oneness with his camera means he can work quickly, unobtrusively, with a fixed lens, fixed shutter speed and fixed aperture to be sure he can grab that shot exactly as it is. He is also a purist: everything is black and white, and nothing is ever cropped or enlarged in post-processing. The shot has to work perfectly right from the moment it is taken. No frills, just the people, the place and composition "as-found". The hard part lies in the finding. Having learnt how to set inhibitions firmly to one side doesn't make him brusque or invasive. There is a kind of detached compassion, a sense of discretion, caring and human interest, in these photographs that ensures their authenticity and immediacy. There is always a hallmark of respect, which also avoids any trace of judgement or pity. The "documentary" way it is. They are never the photographs of a voyeur: "If people can do what they do in the streets, then so can I," he says about his approach. He is very forthright, perhaps a quality shared by others who have once been lifeboat volunteers risking their lives. What this means is that photographer and subject are on a totally equal footing. "I am not making fun of anyone, I'm just taking their pictures". He also says "it is rather like taking my own photograph again and again". He may use his legs and elbows to get into the scene but that is precisely what makes them so alive. There is the occasional blur of a moving hand or doors opening/closing but this is what underscores the "documentary reality" and its vivid lifeblood - taking us, the observers, right into the action, encouraging us to ask all the questions Crespel handles in his shots so instinctively… who, where, why? We are involved, finding ourselves in the right place at the right time not once or twice but dozens and dozens of times - without any of the almost obsessive tramping of a man seeking his own right times in right places - the light, the frame, the people and even that dash of cheek needed to grab certain pictures. Pictures that we see all the time - like the boy trying to peek under all those petticoats - but do not quite register. Catching these moments is where the art lies; capturing simplicity is never easy but when it happens the result, as in GOTCHA!, is striking and memorable.
This "simplicity" achieves depth, not just in composition but also in content. We are there, rubbing our own shoulders with the photographer and the scenario, suddenly glimpsing instants of reality - faceless fingers opening shutters, a father and son standing stock still in the rain gazing fixedly at something (what… why?) - that is all around us yet so easily overlooked, ignored, avoided. Yet the next question, inevitably, is "how real is reality?" Are these expressions and gestures something only the eye of the camera can capture: Do they distort or re-create real and unreal? Be that as it may, these photos remind us we are all human and all share the same, ultimately levelling human condition. It is an achievement. They remind us that this is the way it is.

Peter Eustace

ITALIANO
"GOTCHA!' libro di street photography

È così stanno le cose.
Paul Crespel insiste sul fatto che la sua è una fotografia documentaria: il suo soggetto è la gente, e mostra le persone così come sono e la vita così com'è. Penso che questa affermazione non significhi affatto che non vi sia arte o mestiere nelle sue immagini, che invece dimostrano di essere operata di un fotografo di grande perizia dotato di occhio acuto e riflessi eccezionalmente veloci. Essere nel posto giusto al momento giusto non è cosa che accade per pura coincidenza: è necessario un duro lavoro di padronanza tecnica, il controllo totale della macchina fotografica e, soprattutto nel caso di Paul, la tenacia di percorrere chilometri e chilometri a piedi, attraversando il paesaggio urbano più e più volte per assorbire le scene, lasciare che le persone si abituino alla sua presenza e perfino prevedere certi scatti effettivamente prima che avvengano. Il suo strettissimo rapporto con la macchina fotografica gli permette di lavorare in modo rapido e discreto con un obiettivo fisso, velocità fissa dell'otturatore e apertura fissa, per essere sicuro di poter afferrare ogni scatto proprio come'è nella realtà. Lui è anche un purista: tutto è in bianco e nero, e niente è mai ritagliato o ingrandito nell'elaborazione al computer. Lo scatto deve funzionare perfettamente fin dal momento in cui è catturato. Senza fronzoli: solo le persone, il luogo e la composizione "così come viene trovata". La parte difficile sta nel trovarla. Paul ha imparato a mettere da parte con fermezza le proprie inibizioni, eppure questo non lo rende né brusco né invadente; al contrario, in queste fotografie c'è una sorta di compassione distaccata, un senso di discrezione, di comprensione e di interesse umano, che garantisce la loro autenticità e immediatezza. C'è sempre un marchio di rispetto, che evita anche qualsiasi traccia di giudizio o di pietà; emerge il "modo documentario" che si limita a mostrare come stanno le cose. Non sono mai le fotografie di un voyeur: "Se la gente può fare per la strada, pubblicamente, quella che fa, allora io tutto ciò lo posso fotografare", spiega Paul in merito al suo modo di andare a caccia di immagini. È decisamente schietto: una qualità necessaria e condivisa tra chi, come lui, è stato volontario sulla lancia di salvataggio, rischiando ogni volta la vita.
Quanto ho evidenziato fin qui significa che il fotografo e il soggetto stanno su un livello di assoluta parità. "Non prendo in giro le persone, scatto solo foto di loro". E aggiunge: "È un po' come scattare una fotografia di me stesso ancora e ancora". Usa gambe e anche gomiti per entrare nel cuore della scena, ed è proprio questo che rende i suoi scatti così vivi. Vi è la sfocatura occasionale di una mano in movimento o di porte che si aprono o si chiudono, ma questo è ciò che rileva la realtà documentaria e la sua linfa vitale, portando noi - gli osservatori - dentro il cuore dell'azione e incoraggiandoci a fare tutte le domande che Paul Crespel tratta nei suoi scatti così istintivamente… chi, dove, perché?
Rimaniamo coinvolti trovandoci così, pure noi, nel posto giusto al momento giusto, non una o due ma decine e decine di volte, a spalla a spalla con il fotografo dentro la scena - senza dover compiere un solo passo, senza doverci esporre una sola volta, senza dover ricercare la luce giusta, il contesto giusto, l'attimo giusto e nemmeno agire quel pizzico di furbizia necessario a volte per cogliere certe inquadrature. Sono immagini che vediamo sempre, quotidiane - come il ragazzino che cerca di sbirciare sotto tutte quelle sottane - ma che abitualmente non notiamo. Catturare questi momenti: ecco dove risiede l'arte. La semplicità non è mai facile da cogliere in immagine; ma quando succede il risultato - come in GOTCHA! - è sorprendente e memorabile.
Questa apparente semplicità permette a noi, in quanto spettatori, di essere toccati non solo dalla potenza della composizione, ma anche dalla profondità dei contenuti. Siamo proprio lì con il fotografo, intravedendo improvvisi attimi di realtà - mani solitarie che aprono imposte, un padre e un figlio immobili sotto la pioggia che guardano intensamente un punto lontano… che cosa, perché? Sprazzi di realtà che sono sempre intorno a noi, e che così spesso trascuriamo, ignoriamo, e a volte addirittura evitiamo. Così, la domanda successiva inevitabilmente sarebbe: Quanto reale è la realtà? Queste espressioni e questi gesti sono immagini che solo l'occhio di un abile fotografo è in grado di catturare? Sia come sia, queste foto ci ricordano che siamo tutti umani e che tutti condividano la stessa paritaria umana condizione. Si tratta di una conquista.
È così che stanno le cose.

Peter Eustace